What were the Factory conditions like in the industrial revolution?

What were working conditions like in britian? During the industrial revolution and how the became better? Thanks in advance

Hi again,

-The factories were very hot
-Poor ventilation meant it was hard to breath
-No safety precautions, workers were often injured or hurt
-cramped conditions and being bent over all the time lead to deformations
-12-14 hours of work a day
-No clocks allowed, no idea of time
-employers hired men to beat workers not doing good job
-Due to fibres in air, many people got lung disease
-Kids and women employed because they are smaller and get less pay
-Kids crawled under machinery to get rubbish they were called scavengers
-Kids mended the spinning machines while they were still on
-Workers often hurt, a lot!!!!!
-In mines, it was hard
-Kids employed to sit in the dark as ventilation openers, men miners, women haulers

It changed with workers trying to get rights, the establishment of unions ect….


5 Responses to What were the Factory conditions like in the industrial revolution?

  1. Read Charles Dickens’s novel Oliver Twist; it seemed horrible, sweaty, stuffy, filled with greed and tyrannical bosses.
    References :

  2. Hi again,

    -The factories were very hot
    -Poor ventilation meant it was hard to breath
    -No safety precautions, workers were often injured or hurt
    -cramped conditions and being bent over all the time lead to deformations
    -12-14 hours of work a day
    -No clocks allowed, no idea of time
    -employers hired men to beat workers not doing good job
    -Due to fibres in air, many people got lung disease
    -Kids and women employed because they are smaller and get less pay
    -Kids crawled under machinery to get rubbish they were called scavengers
    -Kids mended the spinning machines while they were still on
    -Workers often hurt, a lot!!!!!
    -In mines, it was hard
    -Kids employed to sit in the dark as ventilation openers, men miners, women haulers

    It changed with workers trying to get rights, the establishment of unions ect….
    References :
    Head

  3. Bloody awful! Long worker hours, inhuman and dangerous conditions, child labour.
    They didn’t start to improve until workers started to get together and form protest groups, later called Unions.
    The Luddites were possibly the first protester in the UK, in 1811.
    The Peterloo Massacre occurred in Manchester in 1819 when protests for better working conditions were brutally suppressed. 11 people were killed and over 400 injured by the local Yeomanry (soldiers).
    The Chartists was a movement in the mid 19th century which pressed for workers’ rights and male suffrage based on the People’s Charter, a document written in 1838 by William Lovett and other radicals of the London Working Men’s Association.
    References :

  4. look around you today low pay people treated like they are nothing they are being given the great gift of a job they should knuckle down and do anything you want them to fortunately we don’t have the conditions they worked in you must remember it was also an experimental period and methods left a lot to be desired many died in industrial accidents there was little in the way of safety fumes chemicals smoke furnaces in the mills the dust was incredibly bad children were used to get in places too small for adults under dangerous machinery up chimneys the wealthy would have that again if we let them their minds are still the same money is king
    References :

  5. Loud noisy and dangerous, long hours, low pay and no rights for the workers.

    Think about each of those matters and address them and how they have changed.
    Think about the machinery and you would have seen a lot of moving chains and belts on open invitation for a finger or arm for instant amputation. Only after numerous accidents would a safety cage or something be added.

    Now thanks to the net you can look at those old pictures of factories, foundries etc and see what they looked like then and think of how you could improve them

    Chetak
    References :

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