How did Richard Arkwright contribute to the industrial revolution?

How did Richard Arkwright contribute to the industrial revolution? And how specifically did he contribute to the Industrial Revolution with water frame?

Sir Richard Arkwright (1732 – 1792) was an English inventor & industrialist who, probably with the assistance of others, developed the first practical way of spinning using rollers, which he patented in 1769. At first, these machines were powered by animals then, at Cromford, Derbyshire, by water (1771) and, finally, by steam. (Incidentally, the mill at Cromford is still standing, I’ve actually seen it). Arkwright invented, or introduced, machinery to carry out the remaining preparatory processes. His mill at Cromford was one of the wonders of the age, resulting in his being one of the first "capitalists" of the Industrial Revolution. Most reference books would suggest that Arkwright "pirated" rather than invented the water frame which could spin coarse but strong thread and be driven by water power. A water frame was basically a water powered spinning wheel. His work was superceded by that of Samuel Crompton who, along with his wife, invented and, with the help of a £5000 grant from parliament in recognition of his efforts, eventually had 4 million spindles producing yarn on his "mules." This was like having 4 million women on 4 million spinning wheels – only faster.


3 Responses to How did Richard Arkwright contribute to the industrial revolution?

  1. he built the water frame. by doing this, factories were built because of the creation of this (the start to the IR). also, new inventions were created because of the water frame’s success thus, factories no longer had to be built near water, they could be built in the city. this meant that people would begin to work in urban areas instead of rural areas.
    References :

  2. Sir Richard Arkwright (1732 – 1792) was an English inventor & industrialist who, probably with the assistance of others, developed the first practical way of spinning using rollers, which he patented in 1769. At first, these machines were powered by animals then, at Cromford, Derbyshire, by water (1771) and, finally, by steam. (Incidentally, the mill at Cromford is still standing, I’ve actually seen it). Arkwright invented, or introduced, machinery to carry out the remaining preparatory processes. His mill at Cromford was one of the wonders of the age, resulting in his being one of the first "capitalists" of the Industrial Revolution. Most reference books would suggest that Arkwright "pirated" rather than invented the water frame which could spin coarse but strong thread and be driven by water power. A water frame was basically a water powered spinning wheel. His work was superceded by that of Samuel Crompton who, along with his wife, invented and, with the help of a £5000 grant from parliament in recognition of his efforts, eventually had 4 million spindles producing yarn on his "mules." This was like having 4 million women on 4 million spinning wheels – only faster.
    References :
    Who Did What. Published by Mitchell Beazley, 1974.
    Eureka: A History of Inventions From the Wheel to the Computer.

  3. Is that the fat bloke that lives down our street. Always wears a white vest with ketchup down it, never has a shave and smells like he has shat his pants?
    References :

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